Art in Sonoma

Next at SVMA

On September 17, The Sonoma Valley Musuem of Art will open “Sonida Pirata: What You Need You Have to Borrow.” In Latin America it is common for popular music to be pirated and sold by street vendors as commercial merchandise. The artists in the upcoming exhibition take their cue from this phenomenon of sonido pirata (literally, “pirated sound”), making use of appropriated sounds and images and utilizing approaches to art-making that mimic and reflect black market economies. Working with video, music, performance, sculpture and installation, the artists create new sound and visual landscapes that function as forms of economic and cultural resistance. Curated by Julio Cesar Morales.

The quiet type

A hyper-realistic sculpture by Carole Feuerman is among the figurative works in “Body Language 2011,”  at A New Leaf Gallery | Sculpturesite at Cornerstone Sonoma. The show closes September 4. New York-based Feuerman creates amazingly real figures in resin, cast marble, and bronze, applying dozens, sometimes hundreds, of coats of oil paint to create realistic flesh tones. Seven artists are represented in a show owner and curator Brigitte Micmacker calls “an updated tribute to the most enduring subject in art… a comprehensive range of techniques and materials, from intimate works in ceramic to larger-than-life wood constructions.” 23588 Arnold Drive. 933.1300. Sculpturesite.com.

Youthful expression

“Poetry” by Sharon Sittloh

Art created by Sonoma Valley High School students in the Arts Guild of Sonomaís summer mentor program will be featured in the guildís September show. The following member artists will also be part of the exhibition: Patricia Akay, Roberta Alexander, Barbara Aliza, Pat Biggs, Hugh Buttram, Beth Changstrom,George Dawnay, Irene Ehret, Zaza Fetterly, Yvonne Martin Gambrione, Christine Gonzalves, Katherine Green, Susan Heeringa-Pieper, Cynthia Hipkiss, Ray Jacobsen, Paul Kirley, Sandra Lane, Christine MacDonald, Helen Mehl, Andrea Giovanna Patri, Katie Richardson, Joan Shepherd, Sharon Sittloh, Lyn Swan and Thena Trygstad. Works include pieces in acrylic, encaustic, oil and watercolors; jewelry; mixed media; metal sculpture and more. The show opens with a reception on Friday, September 2 from 6 to 8 p.m. The gallery at 140 E. Napa St. is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Monday.

Lessons in clay

“Hopscotch” by Margaret Keelam

Translated from Latin, the exhibition title “Doceo Argilla” means, “I teach clay.” An apt title for a range of works by 16 ceramic artist/educators, opens at Gallery 212 with a free reception on Friday, September 2. The show will include some of California’s most notable ceramic artists, many of whom — Richard Shaw, Annabeth Rosen, Richard Burkett, JoAnne Hayakawa, and Margaret Keelan to name a few — are recognized internationally as major contributors to the advancement of the field. A reception will open the show on Friday, September 2, from 5 to 7 p.m. Gallery 212 is open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m, to 4 p.m. at the Sonoma Community Center, 276 W. Napa. 938-4626 x1. sonomacommunitycenter.org.

New Works

La Haye Gallery
148 East Napa Street

New works by Lia Bonagura-Transue and Jim Callahan

July 16 through September 6, 2011

Gallery hours, Thursday through Monday, noon to 8 p.m.

Sculptor Jim Callahan brings together an eclectic mix of his newest pieces for this show.  Callahan is a master of casting incredible, works in bronze which depict both his favorites from the animal world as well as striking examples of the human form.

Lia Bonagura-Transue has worked primarily in oils for the past 20 years.  Her new show at La Haye will highlight her representational style, which explores and accentuates “real life” without compromising the imagination.


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