Jumpin’ java – there’s a new roaster coming to town

Submitted Photo Taylor Maid Farms’ President Mark Inman relaxes at his flagship store with a hot cup of joe.  Soon, the Valley will be able to enjoy the fresh roasted beans as well.

Submitted Photo Taylor Maid Farms’ President Mark Inman relaxes at his flagship store with a hot cup of joe. Soon, the Valley will be able to enjoy the fresh roasted beans as well.

A business model focused on community-fueled growth has helped make Taylor Maid Farms the largest coffee roaster in Sonoma County. With a flagship enterprise originally opened in Sebastopol in 1993, the organic coffee company has gained rapid momentum, and a loyal following, in the past eight years, allowing them to open a new roastery here in the Valley.
Taylor Maid Farms’ new West Napa Street digs – the former location of Homegrown Bagels – is undergoing extensive renovations but is set to open in early March. The remodeled space will house the roastery and retail store where patrons will be able to purchase beans and high-quality coffee hardware like brewers, grinders and more. An interesting twist – refilling your coffee can – is sure to bring the budget and environmentally-conscious in the door.
According to President Mark Inman, the company philosophy is sustainability.  “Our motto is recycle, reuse and repurpose,” says Inman. “Refilling their coffee cans is just one way our customers can save money and help the environment.  It’s what we’re all about.”
To that end, Taylor Maid Farm’s coffee is all certified organic. Inman travels to some of the most remote communities in the world to personally source fair-trade, shade-grown coffee produced by small family farms. Similar to wine grapes, Inman buys and classifies his beans by region, appellation and botanical variety.
In the soon-to-be-opened roastery, Inman has exposed a long-covered tin wall and is installing a restored Royal #5 coffee roaster from the early 1900s. Inman says that renovations are on schedule with electrical work and cabinetry being installed, as well as metalwork and a new façade. It should be noted the store will not include a café but Taylor Maid Farms will have brewed coffee available for customers.
Once the new venture is up and running, Inman plans on holding a “town hall meeting” to garner investors for his next shop in Novato. He needs to raise $80,000 and will accept investments as small as $1,000 until his goal is reached. In return for each investment, Taylor Maid Farms promises an annual percentage return of 8 percent – paid monthly – for five years.
“Our customers have helped us grow to where we are today. We’re simply returning that favor by building our business one community at a time,” said Inman.


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